June 2018


Today, instead of Letters from Elsewhere, here’s a post about me, to catch up with some of the things I’ve done since… whenever.

The other day, I wrote two new verses to an old song. They’re inspired by a strange phenomenon: rain.

Look what they’ve done to my June, Ma

Look what they’ve done to my June, Ma.
Look what they’ve done to my June.
Well it’s the only thing they could do half right,
And it’s turning out all wrong, Ma.
Look what they’ve done to my June.

Look what they’ve done to my sun, Ma.
Look what they’ve done to my sun.
Well, they took some clouds and made them black
And covered up the sun, Ma.
Look what they’ve done to my sun.

Yes, it’s been raining heavily in various parts of the country, but not so heavily in Jerusalem. There has been flooding. One of the most afflicted towns was Sderot. You’d think they’ve had enough to contend with without the weather joining in.

It never rains in June in Israel. Don’t they know that?

If you don’t know the original song, I’m sure you can find it on Youtube. “Look what they’ve done to my song.”

I’ve appeared on a few other blogs:

Author

Topic

My Post

C.J. Sutton

Fear

A Fear of People

Carrie-Ann Schless

Diary Entry

Noname’s Diary

Megan Mayfair

Espresso Tales

Coffee with Miriam Drori

Val Penny

My Writing Story

If you’d told me I was going to be a writer

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I’ve hosted two authors on the social anxiety blog: Jo Fenton and Val Penny.

I hosted characters on this blog in Letters from Elsewhere:

Character

From

By

Tina

The Brotherhood

Jo Fenton

DI Hunter Wilson

Hunter’s Chase, Hunter’s Revenge

Val Penny

Joseph Flynn

Heart of Stone

John Jackson

Anne

The Road to Newgate

Kate Braithwaite

Harriet

Harriet of Hare Street

Angela Rigley

.
And I was delighted to receive this from a grateful customer.

Me with Chasing the Case

Yes, I was the editor for this lovely novel: Chasing the Case by Joan Livingston.

And I have lots of new and exciting ideas for my writing. If I stop sleeping, I might be able to put them into practice. Who needs sleep, anyway?

Happy reading! See you next Friday for another Letter from Elsewhere!

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Letters from Elsewhere

I think today’s visitor is my youngest ever. She’s only thirteen and comes from Victorian London and the pages of Harriet of Hare Street by Angela Rigley. Harriet has brought a letter to her father, who has just died. I believe she wants some answers.

Dear Papa in Heaven,

I miss you so much. Why did you have to die? Mama has not told me how it happened. Not the real circumstances. She just said that you fell off a bridge. Well, dear Papa, why did you not hold on tighter? I am sorry William Henry died. We all are. But were you so upset that you jumped off? I am sure that is not the case, but some people seem to think that was what happened. Anyway, Father Lane would not have given you a Catholic burial if he thought so. I would hate to think of you burning in Hell.

What is Heaven like? I wish you could tell me. I wish… but anyway, dear Papa, I hope you are happy up there with Jesus. Say hello to him from me and tell him I vow to be a better person.

I am sure you know about the twins. Mama says William Thomas is a glutton, and she is hopeful that little Winifred will thrive, although she is still very weak. Please look after them for us, and put in a good word with God and the Virgin Mary. Have you met her yet?

Well, dear Papa, I must go. I have a job now, but you must know all about it. Do you like my window arrangements? I don’t suppose you remember teaching me how to make stars. Well, I do, and that is how I made the hanging one, covered in shiny paper, so when the light catches it, it sparkles like a real one. Just for you.
I will write again soon,
Love and kisses,
Your dutiful daughter,

Harriet.

Oh, you poor girl. I do hope things turn out well for you.Harriet of Hare Street by Angela Rigley

About Harriet of Hare Street

Living in a run-down area of the East end of London in the late nineteenth century is hard enough, but when thirteen-year old Harriet Harding opens the door to a stranger, who thrusts a baby into her arms, she cannot imagine how her life will change. How can she cope with a baby? And what will her parents say when they return?

You can find Harriet of Hare Street on Amazon UK or other Amazons.

About Angela Rigley

Married to Don, with five children and nine grandchildren, Angela lives in Derbyshire. Her hobbies include singing in her church choir; genealogy, having traced ancestors back to 1520; gardening; flower arranging; playing Scrabble; Sudoku; meals out; family gatherings; and, when she has any spare time she loves to read. She is the treasurer of Eastwood Writers’ Group.

Find her on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and on her website.

Letters from Elsewhere

Today I’m delighted to welcome Anne to my blog. When she wrote the letter she’s brought, she existed only as a flashback, because the letter pre-dates the novel she comes from: The Road to Newgate by Kate Braithwaite. Anne has just eloped with Nathaniel Thompson, a man deemed unsuitable by her family.

Love Lane,
Nr. Billingsgate,
London
Fourteenth day of June 1678

Dear Sarah,
By now Mother and Father have my letter and I am married. I am sorry for nothing but that you will have to bear their anger. Father will harp at length – I can imagine it most clearly – about my husband’s unsuitability and the betrayal he doubtless believes this is. Mother will bear it more quietly, but we both know she will side with him.
Can we hope that you and James will be our friends? Nathaniel is not what our father says. He has a position and talent. He is the Licenser of the Presses – James himself said it was an important role. Remember, he told us both that Nathaniel’s future prospects are excellent. He is not wealthy now, it’s true, but he is good and kind and clever. And so very handsome, Sarah!
Don’t write back to tell me we have been too hasty. Bite your tongue and still your pen, if you love me. We have not known each other long, it is true, but I know his heart, dear sister. What could be more important?
Come and visit us? Write to me. Promise you will come. Our home is not what you are used to – be prepared for a surprise, dear one – but it is clean and neat and I am determined to learn to manage everything. Tomorrow, Nat’s friend and publisher Henry Broome is to visit us after dinner. I do so hope to make a good impression. Visit me in a day or two and I will tell you all.
Your sister,
Anne

I’m told, although I won’t, of course, pass this on to my visitor, that only a few months after this letter, Anne and Nat’s young marriage will be tested when Nat becomes involved in an attempt to discredit the Popish Plot and its author, Titus Oates.

About The Road to Newgate

The Road To Newgate

What price justice?

London 1678.

Titus Oates, an unknown preacher, creates panic with wild stories of a Catholic uprising against Charles II. The murder of a prominent Protestant magistrate appears to confirm that the Popish Plot is real.

Only Nathaniel Thompson, writer and Licenser of the Presses, instinctively doubts Oates’s revelations. Even his young wife, Anne, is not so sure. And neither know that their friend William Smith has personal history with Titus Oates.

When Nathaniel takes a public stand, questioning the plot and Oates’s integrity, the consequences threaten them all.

The Road to Newgate is available to pre-order from Amazon.

About Kate Braithwaite

Kate Braithwaite

Kate Braithwaite was born and grew up in Edinburgh, Scotland. Her first novel, Charlatan, was longlisted for the Mslexia New Novel Award and the Historical Novel Society Award. Kate lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and three children.

The Road to Newgate, a story of love, lies and injustice in 17th century London will be published by Crooked Cat Books on July 16th.

Find out more about Kate on her website.